Virtual Exhibitions

Selected exhibitions from previous years may be found on Google Arts & Culture.

Excellent: UNESCO Memory of the World

Autorenbild in der Bamberger Apokalypse | SBB, Msc.Bibl.140, Bl. 1r
Autorenbild in der Bamberger Apokalypse | SBB, Msc.Bibl.140, Bl. 1r

There are 15 manuscripts from the early Middle Ages featured in this virtual exhibition, which was organized on the occasion of the 25th anniversary of Bamberg as a World Heritage Site. The oldest codex is the Lorscher Arzneibuch, which is a collection of medicinal remedies dating approximately to Charlemagne’s reign (ca. 800 C.E.). This key work for the transmission of Classical medicine into the Christian Middle Ages has been registered in the UNESCO World Memory of the World Documentary Heritage Programme since 2013.

 

Other highlights are the wonderfully illuminated manuscripts from the Abbey of Reichenau in Bodensee that commissioned by Emperor Otto III and Henry II a round 1000 C.E. Two of them belong to the group of Reichenau manuscripts, which were already included in the UNESCO World Documentary Heritage in 2003: The Song of Songs and the commentary on the Book of Daniel, as well as the famous Bamberg Apocalypse with its cycle of 50 miniatures.

 

The cover of the Bamberg Apocalypse was once decorated with an impressive agate plate. The gemstone from the treasury of the Munich Residence can be admired digitally. The virtual exhibition is enrichened by another Codex, the Reichenau Evangeliary from the Bavarian State Library in Munich, another part of the UNESCO initiative.

 

Virtual Exhibition

Excellent: UNESCO Memory of the World

 

 

Colours Between Covers

Initiale mit der Verkündigung an Maria | SBB, Msc.Lit.112, Bl. 10r
Initiale mit der Verkündigung an Maria | SBB, Msc.Lit.112, Bl. 10r

The 15th century was a time of religious and cultural upheaval. Penitential preachers criticized societal ills, and monastic reform movements sought to align life in secular communities more closely with Christian norms. These changes also included the transcription and manufacturing of books after Johannes Gutenberg invented the printing press in the middle of the century that enabled their rapid production and distribution.

 

Even though books were becoming increasingly available, they were anything but a mass commodity. Each reflects the individual needs of its owner, especially when it is adorned with artistic decorations. Not only were hand-written work decorated in such a way, but printed texts were also often richly decorated with painted initials, borders, and miniatures.

 

The collection of illuminated books of the 15th and early 16th century, which the Bamberg State Library treasures, is to this day largely unknown. A representative profile of about 20 examples shows the range of the collection. At the beginning is the drawing of a liturgical vestment acquired in 2015 Rationale from Pommersfelden. There are manuscripts written by nuns and the printed Koberger Bible that came from Nuremberg to Bamberg, but important works of art that were create in Bamberg as well, such as a chronicle of the Michelsberg abbots and various liturgical prints.

 

Virtual Exhibition

Colours Between Covers

Miniatures of the Bamberg Apocalypse

Drachen mit sechs Schlangenköpfchen | SBB, Msc.Bibl.140, Bl. 31v
Drachen mit sechs Schlangenköpfchen | SBB, Msc.Bibl.140, Bl. 31v

The Bamberg Apocalypse is the most important manuscript of the Bamberg State Library. In addition to the Book of Revelations (the last book of the Bible), it still contains an evangeliary. This second part of the text presents the portions of the gospel texts read during Masses of the central feasts of the Lord and the saints. The content was therefore not tailored to everyday liturgical practice.


The codex was written around 1010 on the island of Reichenau on Bodensee by one primary scribe and two other hands. With its luxurious decorations, it represents one of the greatest creations of Ottonian book art. The text is adorned with countless initials with ornaments. The Apocalypse is accompanied by 50 large-sized miniatures of expressive effect. The manuscript was given by the Emperor Henry II and his wife Kunigunde around 1020 to the Collegiate Church of St. Stephan in Bamberg for its dedication. The manuscript was added to the World Register of Documentary Heritage in 2003 by the International Committee for the UNESCO Memory of the World Program.


Virtual Exhibition

Miniatures of the Bamberg Apocalypse

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